Exhibition

Low Rise High Density Exhibition Opening

lowrise

The Institute for Public Architecture (IPA), in conjunction with AIA New York, next week will open Low Rise High Density at the Center for Architecture. An exhibition “examining a housing type celebrated in the 1960s and 70s, and what it means in the United States today, the exhibition presents original oral histories with project architects and global case studies from the last 50 years.” Running April 25-June 29, 2013, the exhibition is curated by Karen Kubey, executive director of the IPA, and designed by The Letter D. The official opening is Thursday, April 25, from 6-8pm.

Forty years ago, low-rise, high-density housing offered a substitute for the high-rise model then dominating public housing in the United States. Dense enough to support public transportation, yet low enough to avoid dependence on elevators, the type attempts to bring together the benefits of urban and suburban living. Presenting architectural drawings, photographs, and oral histories with project architects, Low Rise High Density traces typology over time. The consideration of environmental and social ideas embedded in low-rise, high-density housing is as urgent now as it was when the typology was first developed. Today we can look at low-rise, high-density housing as an alternative to suburban sprawl.

Click here to learn more about Low Rise High Density, online at CfA.AIANY.org.

Autodesk Gallery PID Exhibition at TED

pidebanner

We are thrilled to have our Autodesk Gallery exhibition, Public Interest Design: Products, Places, & Processes, on display this week at the 2013 TED Conference in Long Beach, Calif. The exhibition, guest-curated by our own John Cary and journalist Courtney E. Martin–in association with Autodesk Gallery team members Jason Medal-Katz, Matthew Tierney, and Roddy Wykes, among others–opened in October 2012, and was spotlighted here on the TED Blog yesterday, concluding with the following:

Ultimately, our aim was to communicate something not about design, per se, but about dignity. Environmental psychology tells us that the moment we are born, the world around us—the rooms we sleep in, the classrooms we study in, the outdoor spaces we have access to, the bureaucracies we see our parents wrestle with—signals something about our own identity, our own worth, what we can expect from life. In this way, we are a reflection of the design we experience in our lives. Which leads us to the critical question: how do we make a world that is more hospitable and healthy for all of us, that signals back to us that we belong, that we deserve beauty and functionality and dignity? And in instances where design, be that of products, places, or processes, is less than ideal, what changes can be made quickly, simply, easily, or painlessly?

Click here to read “Putting the public back in public interest design: The making of an exhibit at TED2013,” online at TED.com.

Pratt Exhibition: “Good on Purpose”

pratt

Good on Purpose,” a new exhibition showcasing the power of design for social impact, opened late last month in the Pratt Graduate Communication Design Gallery. Showcasing the world of Savage Brands and Savage Good–Houston-based entities “that provide branding and marketing communications for corporations and nonprofit organizations, respectively–the exhibition illustrates the power of design for social impact and demonstrates how design can drive change. The exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2013.

“Design can be used in a way that does good and benefits all of us,” said Doug Hebert, principal at Savage Brands. “The collection on display is strategic, purposeful and representative of how good design with purpose can make a difference. We hope our exhibit will inspire students and other designers to recognize the impact design can have on our community and use their talents to affect change.”

Click here to learn more about “Good on Purpose” exhibition, online at PrattGradComD.com.

Pratt Exhibition: "Good on Purpose"

pratt

Good on Purpose,” a new exhibition showcasing the power of design for social impact, opened late last month in the Pratt Graduate Communication Design Gallery. Showcasing the world of Savage Brands and Savage Good–Houston-based entities “that provide branding and marketing communications for corporations and nonprofit organizations, respectively–the exhibition illustrates the power of design for social impact and demonstrates how design can drive change. The exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2013.

“Design can be used in a way that does good and benefits all of us,” said Doug Hebert, principal at Savage Brands. “The collection on display is strategic, purposeful and representative of how good design with purpose can make a difference. We hope our exhibit will inspire students and other designers to recognize the impact design can have on our community and use their talents to affect change.”

Click here to learn more about “Good on Purpose” exhibition, online at PrattGradComD.com.

Via Verde Exhibition Opens January 31

viaverde

Across town at AIA New York‘s Center for Architecture, another exhibition–“Via Verde: The Green Way“–will spotlight a single, built example of green affordable housing, an acclaimed development in the South Bronx, profiled here previously. The exhibition opens January 31 and runs through February 27, 2013.

Via Verde is a housing development in the South Bronx consisting of 222 mixed-income apartments in a step-up plan. It was the winning scheme of the New Housing New York Legacy Competition, a design contest initiated by AIANY, in conjunction with the New York City Department of Housing Preservation & Development, and the New Housing New York Steering Committee. New Housing New York challenged designers to create an exemplary and replicable model that encourages new excellence in sustainable affordable housing. The project was designed by two firms, Dattner Architects and Grimshaw Architects, joined by Jonathan Rose Companies and The Phipps Houses Group as co-developers.

Click here to learn more about the Center for Architecture’s Via Verde exhibition, online at CFA.AIANY.org. Credit: David Sundberg/Esto.

“Making Room” Micro-Apartment Exhibition Opens

makingroom

This week marked the opening of an important new exhibition, “Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers,” curated and hosted at the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibition, set to run through September 15, “showcases innovative design solutions to better accommodate New York City’s changing, and sometimes surprising, demographics, including a rising number of single people.

Making Room features a full-sized, flexibly furnished micro-studio apartment of just 325 square feet–a size prohibited in most areas of the city. Visitors to the exhibition will see models and drawings of housing designs by architectural teams commissioned in 2011 by Citizens Housing & Planning Council, in partnership with the Architectural League of New York. The exhibition also presents winning designs from the Bloomberg administration’s recently-launched pilot competition to test new housing models, as well as examples set by other cities in the United States and around the world, including Seattle, Providence, Montreal, San Diego, and Tokyo.

Click here to learn more about the Making Room exhibition, online at , or click here to read “New York City extols virtues of tiny apartments,” one of the better articles we’ve seen covering the exhibition (including a photo), online at Salon.com.

"Making Room" Micro-Apartment Exhibition Opens

makingroom

This week marked the opening of an important new exhibition, “Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers,” curated and hosted at the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibition, set to run through September 15, “showcases innovative design solutions to better accommodate New York City’s changing, and sometimes surprising, demographics, including a rising number of single people.

Making Room features a full-sized, flexibly furnished micro-studio apartment of just 325 square feet–a size prohibited in most areas of the city. Visitors to the exhibition will see models and drawings of housing designs by architectural teams commissioned in 2011 by Citizens Housing & Planning Council, in partnership with the Architectural League of New York. The exhibition also presents winning designs from the Bloomberg administration’s recently-launched pilot competition to test new housing models, as well as examples set by other cities in the United States and around the world, including Seattle, Providence, Montreal, San Diego, and Tokyo.

Click here to learn more about the Making Room exhibition, online at , or click here to read “New York City extols virtues of tiny apartments,” one of the better articles we’ve seen covering the exhibition (including a photo), online at Salon.com.

NYTimes Slide Show: "Good, by Design"

Accompanying the “Dignifying Design” op-ed that appeared in the print edition of The New York TimesSunday Review section is an online slide show of related projects. Several of the projects appear in the new Autodesk Gallery exhibition, such as the Butaro Hospital in Rwanda by MASS Design Group (featured prominently in the article) as well as the Embrace Nest infant warmer and the ReMotion Knee by D-Rev: Design Revolution.

We are especially happy to introduce a few non-exhibition projects, including the gorgeous Windsor Farmers Market by the Studio H high school design/build program of Project H Design in North Carolina, the amazing Lions Park Playscape by Auburn University‘s Rural Studio students in Greensboro, Ala., and the stunning Masonic Amphitheater in Clifton Forge, Va., by Virginia Tech‘s design/buildLAB.

Click here to view the “Good, by Design” slideshow, online at NYTimes.com.

NYTimes Slide Show: “Good, by Design”

Accompanying the “Dignifying Design” op-ed that appeared in the print edition of The New York TimesSunday Review section is an online slide show of related projects. Several of the projects appear in the new Autodesk Gallery exhibition, such as the Butaro Hospital in Rwanda by MASS Design Group (featured prominently in the article) as well as the Embrace Nest infant warmer and the ReMotion Knee by D-Rev: Design Revolution.

We are especially happy to introduce a few non-exhibition projects, including the gorgeous Windsor Farmers Market by the Studio H high school design/build program of Project H Design in North Carolina, the amazing Lions Park Playscape by Auburn University‘s Rural Studio students in Greensboro, Ala., and the stunning Masonic Amphitheater in Clifton Forge, Va., by Virginia Tech‘s design/buildLAB.

Click here to view the “Good, by Design” slideshow, online at NYTimes.com.

Autodesk Exhibition Opening Attended by 480

Enormous thanks to the 480 people that turned out for the opening of our Autodesk Gallery exhibition in San Francisco on Thursday, October 4, 2012. Pictures of the event, our co-curators’ remarks, and a roundup of media coverage to follow next week.

Click here to view our introductory infographic about “Public Interest Design: Products, Places, & Processes.”