AIGA

Co.Exist: “The 11 Most Generous Designers”

11most

A week ago today, Rachel Chong, the founder & CEO of Catchafire–an innovative, for-profit, pro bono service matchmaker–took to the pages of Fast Company‘s Co.Exist to profile what she terms “The 11 Most Generous Designers.” The list was co-curated by Chong and Ric Grefé, the executive director of AIGA, and a member of our Public Interest Design 100. Chong writes, “Whether creating a compelling graphic to raise money or developing a cause awareness campaign or producing a never-before-seen-product that improves an infant’s livelihood, these creative thinkers are impacting our society in ways that are hard to forget.”

Included in Chong and Grefé’s list are Matthew Inman, artist and author behind the comedy website TheOatmeal.com; Heather Fleming, co-founder & CEO of Catapult Design; Dawn Hancock, founder and managing director of Firebelly Design; Timothy Prestero, co-founder and CEO of Design That Matters; Michael Murphy & Alan Ricks, co-founders of MASS Design Group; Anne Frederick, executive director of Hester Street Collaborative; Rich Hollant, principal of Co:Lab; Panthea Lee, co-founder and principal of Reboot; Mark Randall, principal of Worldstudio; Debbie Aung Din & Jim Taylor of Proximity Designs; and Robert Fabricant, Vice President of Creative for Frog. (Seven of the 11 are members of our domestic Public Interest Design 100, while others will be profiled among our upcoming global edition.)

Click here to read Rachel Chong & Ric Grefé’s “11 Most Generous Designers,” online at FastCoExist.com. Caption: Debbie Aung Din and Jim Taylor, founders of Proximity Designs.

Co.Exist: "The 11 Most Generous Designers"

11most

A week ago today, Rachel Chong, the founder & CEO of Catchafire–an innovative, for-profit, pro bono service matchmaker–took to the pages of Fast Company‘s Co.Exist to profile what she terms “The 11 Most Generous Designers.” The list was co-curated by Chong and Ric Grefé, the executive director of AIGA, and a member of our Public Interest Design 100. Chong writes, “Whether creating a compelling graphic to raise money or developing a cause awareness campaign or producing a never-before-seen-product that improves an infant’s livelihood, these creative thinkers are impacting our society in ways that are hard to forget.”

Included in Chong and Grefé’s list are Matthew Inman, artist and author behind the comedy website TheOatmeal.com; Heather Fleming, co-founder & CEO of Catapult Design; Dawn Hancock, founder and managing director of Firebelly Design; Timothy Prestero, co-founder and CEO of Design That Matters; Michael Murphy & Alan Ricks, co-founders of MASS Design Group; Anne Frederick, executive director of Hester Street Collaborative; Rich Hollant, principal of Co:Lab; Panthea Lee, co-founder and principal of Reboot; Mark Randall, principal of Worldstudio; Debbie Aung Din & Jim Taylor of Proximity Designs; and Robert Fabricant, Vice President of Creative for Frog. (Seven of the 11 are members of our domestic Public Interest Design 100, while others will be profiled among our upcoming global edition.)

Click here to read Rachel Chong & Ric Grefé’s “11 Most Generous Designers,” online at FastCoExist.com. Caption: Debbie Aung Din and Jim Taylor, founders of Proximity Designs.

AIGA’s “Get Out the Vote 2012″ Poster Campaign

A program of AIGA‘s Design for Democracy initiative, the “Get Out the Vote” campaign invited members to create “nonpartisan posters and videos that inspire the American public to participate in the electoral process and vote in the 2012 general election.” AIGA is hosting an exhibition in New York City from October 3–November 30, 2012, featuring the 2012 Get Out the Vote entries.

The poster design above by Tom Rudman of New York, who explains “Democracy is fragile, dependant and defined by an active electorate. This poster employs red, white and blue tape to represent the electorate and to define the shape of a star.”

Click here for more information and to view all 213 entries to the “Get Out the Vote” initiative.

AIGA's "Get Out the Vote 2012" Poster Campaign

A program of AIGA‘s Design for Democracy initiative, the “Get Out the Vote” campaign invited members to create “nonpartisan posters and videos that inspire the American public to participate in the electoral process and vote in the 2012 general election.” AIGA is hosting an exhibition in New York City from October 3–November 30, 2012, featuring the 2012 Get Out the Vote entries.

The poster design above by Tom Rudman of New York, who explains “Democracy is fragile, dependant and defined by an active electorate. This poster employs red, white and blue tape to represent the electorate and to define the shape of a star.”

Click here for more information and to view all 213 entries to the “Get Out the Vote” initiative.

Gain: AIGA Design for Social Value Conference

AIGA has announced the theme of its annual “Gain” conference, to focus on the social value of design. This year’s conference will take place October 9-10, 2012, in San Francisco. The conference boasts an impressive roster of speakers, including, among others: Patrice Martin, Co-lead & Creative Director of IDEO.org; Emily Pilloton, Founder & Executive Director of Project H Design; Morgan Clendaniel, Editor of Fast Company‘s Co.Exist; and William Drenntel, Co-founder & Editor of Design Observer.

Designers, businesses, organizations and governments recognize the need to take a holistic, human-centered approach to working in the greater world and acknowledge that they must create social value in order to succeed. What designers do on a daily basis–create, communicate, strategize, analyze, translate, collaborate–is what puts them in the perfect position to build social value for their companies, clients and communities. Whether you’re just starting to explore social responsibility or you’re looking for inspiration and best practices on using design to create social change, you’ll find it at “Gain.”

Click here to learn more about “Gain,” AIGA’s Design for Social Value Conference. The early-bird registration deadline is June 6, 2012; rates range from $375-$900 until that date, and $425-$1,050 after.

2012 NEA Art Works Design Grants Announced

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) announced today the results of its August 2011 grant deadline, with fields ranging from arts education and dance, to theater and visual arts. A total of $77.17 million has been granted via 928 grants in this cycle. Among those, the NEA’s grants in the overall field of Design (including architecture, graphic design, etc.) yielded 38 grants totaling $985,000, or an average of $25,000 per grant.

The 38 Design grantees represent 23 cities in 14 states, plus the District of Columbia. New York secured 11 of those grants, with 9 based in New York City alone, while California, DC, Ohio, and Pennsylvania each had three grants. The grant range from $10,000 to support a new website for the Design Trust for Public Space in New York, to $50,000 for a joint Architecture for Humanity / U.S. Green Building Council project, called “Building Blocks for Sustainable Schools,” which is a pilot program for greening schools nationwide.

Click here for the complete list of NEA Art Works grants in Design. Full disclosure: PublicInterestDesign.org‘s own John Cary served as a panelist on the Design grants jury.

ArchRecord: Humanitarian Design Networks

Our coverage of Architectural Record magazine’s “Building for Social Change” issue continues with another excerpt from “The Good List.” Today, we look at ten humanitarian design networks, six of which appear in the actual piece, while two others are profiled in other sections of the bigger list, and another student-focused efforts fell outside the scope of our coverage. The eleven, in all, include affinity, membership, and pledge-based networks specifically focused on design for the public good.

The first six include Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR), the Association for Community Design, Designers Accord, AIGA‘s Design for Good campaign, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum‘s “Design Other 90 Network,” and the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network. Two others, profiled elsewhere, include Architecture for Humanity‘s Open Architecture Network (in the process of being rebranded as Worldchanging) and The 1% pro bono service program of Public Architecture. Three other networks, outside the scope of our coverage, include the campus-based Design for America, the DESIGN 21: Social Design Network, and the Freedom by Design program of the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS).

Click here to read our humanitarian design networks excerpt from “The Good List,” part of Architectural Record’s “Building for Social Change” issue.

Archinect: "Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011"

The following is the introduction to a piece written by John Cary for Archinect, published earlier today. It is titled and thus profiles the “Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011–for the public good.”

‘Tis the season for gift guides, year-end donation appeals, and lots and lots of lists. Among others, we saw a few standout designers among Forbes’s “30 Under 30list earlier this week, and it’s hard to disagree with most of Alissa Walker’s picks in her annual GOOD design year-in-review list, which is always worth a read. The following list, by contrast, favors people, places, and projects that advance the notion of design for the public good. It profiles built projects, new sources of funding, powerful public voices, nonprofit start-ups, and web-based ventures. Lists like this are never comprehensive; this one, for its part, seeks to showcase how design can and is making the world a better place, if not directly transforming people’s experiences and lives. Looking forward, tune in to Archinect for a companion list of the “Top 10 Design Initiatives Worth Watching in 2012,” due out next week.

Click here to read the “Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011″ at Archinect.com.

Archinect: “Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011″

The following is the introduction to a piece written by John Cary for Archinect, published earlier today. It is titled and thus profiles the “Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011–for the public good.”

‘Tis the season for gift guides, year-end donation appeals, and lots and lots of lists. Among others, we saw a few standout designers among Forbes’s “30 Under 30list earlier this week, and it’s hard to disagree with most of Alissa Walker’s picks in her annual GOOD design year-in-review list, which is always worth a read. The following list, by contrast, favors people, places, and projects that advance the notion of design for the public good. It profiles built projects, new sources of funding, powerful public voices, nonprofit start-ups, and web-based ventures. Lists like this are never comprehensive; this one, for its part, seeks to showcase how design can and is making the world a better place, if not directly transforming people’s experiences and lives. Looking forward, tune in to Archinect for a companion list of the “Top 10 Design Initiatives Worth Watching in 2012,” due out next week.

Click here to read the “Top 10 Design Milestones of 2011″ at Archinect.com.

AIGA launches "Design for Good" initiative

AIGA–the professional association for designers, boasting 22,000+ members–has formally launched its much-anticipated “Design for Good” initiative. The video above captures the spirit and potential of Design for Good, challenging designers of all stripes to take on pro bono and social engagement projects.

AIGA understands the opportunity and need to function as a cheerleader, enabler, and connector, “providing designers with the tools, resources, and opportunities to become integral players in social change.” Moreover, “Design for Good aims to channel designers and their creative talent toward addressing community needs.”

Click here to learn more about Design for Good, which PublicInterestDesign.org will be following and covering in its formative months and beyond.