Bryan Bell

First PID Mexico Event Commences Tomorrow

pidmexico

The Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), the BaSiC Initiative, and Design Corps are co-hosting the first ever Public Interest Design Mexico, an open and free two-day global convening in Mexico City beginning September 11th, 2014. Launched to foster discussions around practicing and designing for social impact, the event will feature projects–awarded earlier this year by the SEED Network–that are addressing a multitude of issues faced by Mexican communities and individuals. The first day will focus on Design that Enables and Empowers Communities, with an examination into the possibilities for engagement and involvement for designers in projects that address the needs of communities. Day two will be structured around a series of workshops and roundtables that will address the issues and themes that emerged from day one.

The Public Interest Design Mexico Convening is an opportunity to foster discussion about the practice of designing for social impact and how best to significantly increase the value of design for the public good. Projects are being created all over Mexico which are addressing the many issues faced by communities and individuals.  These projects are taking on the challenging issues of democratic decision making, empowerment and engagement. While inclusive design practices worldwide are beginning to help communities use design to address their most critical issues and define resilient futures as they see fit, as in Mexico, design professionals still remain at the margins of these lively debates and initiatives.

Click here to read more and register to attend PID Mexico for FREE, online at DesignCorps.org/PID-Mexico.

Feature: How will Public Interest Design look in 2024? 18 Practitioners Weigh In

10yrsPID

Rewind to 2004 and think about what you were doing on August 27th. On this day ten years ago, a cold air conditioned breeze was blowing through my hair and onto my sticky skin as I took a break from moving boxes and bags into my apartment in New Orleans. Entering my fourth year of architecture school at Tulane University, I was looking forward to learning a new computer program called Revit. Public interest design–and social impact, community-led, humanitarian, and the lot–hadn’t even entered my evolving architecture vocabulary. Since that hot, humid August day in New Orleans, the field of passionate designers has blossomed beyond anything I could have imagined. Now, students entering their fourth year at Tulane have most likely heard of public interest design, if not participated in a studio or class specifically focused on the subject.

With the immense strides, enthusiasm, and involvement in this field of work since 2004, we were curious to hear from practitioners–new and established, young and, ahem, seasoned–on what the next 10 years has in store. We posed the following question to a few of our favorite designers:

How do you think the field of public interest/ impact design will look in 10 years?

Amongst the eighteen responses below, we see a resounding vision for more established methods, metrics, tools, and a mainstream position within the wider design and architecture industries. With these designers and many more at the helm of this movement, the promise for what we can achieve by 2024 is very bright. More

"Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service"

connection

Our own editor and Design Affects founder Katie Crepeau took to the pages of the AIA Young Architects Forum ‘Connection’ issue on Advocacy. In “Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service,” she traverses through the evolution and emergence of architectural fellowship opportunities in the public realm, citing diverse institutions such as the Van Alen Institute, Public Policy Lab, and San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Innovation. Together with articles from Design CorpsBryan Bell, Center for Public Interest Design’s Sergio Palleroni, Enterprise Community Partners‘ Katie Swenson, Urban Land Institute’s Jess Zimbabwe, and many others, the Advocacy issue highlights the ever-expanding opportunities for architects to make an impact in new ways.

What happens between obtaining an architecture degree and a practicing license typically goes one of three ways: work, return to a university for post-grad studies, or abandon the profession altogether. However, this window of opportunity has the potential to be much more exploratory, both creatively and professionally… how might someone bridge the gap between education and practice by continuing creative interests and grounding oneself in the practicalities of design and building?

Click here to read “Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service” or click here to read the full issue of ‘Connection’ online at Issuu.com/YoungArchitectsForum.

“Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service”

connection

Our own editor and Design Affects founder Katie Crepeau took to the pages of the AIA Young Architects Forum ‘Connection’ issue on Advocacy. In “Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service,” she traverses through the evolution and emergence of architectural fellowship opportunities in the public realm, citing diverse institutions such as the Van Alen Institute, Public Policy Lab, and San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Innovation. Together with articles from Design CorpsBryan Bell, Center for Public Interest Design’s Sergio Palleroni, Enterprise Community Partners‘ Katie Swenson, Urban Land Institute’s Jess Zimbabwe, and many others, the Advocacy issue highlights the ever-expanding opportunities for architects to make an impact in new ways.

What happens between obtaining an architecture degree and a practicing license typically goes one of three ways: work, return to a university for post-grad studies, or abandon the profession altogether. However, this window of opportunity has the potential to be much more exploratory, both creatively and professionally… how might someone bridge the gap between education and practice by continuing creative interests and grounding oneself in the practicalities of design and building?

Click here to read “Fellowships: Redesigning Public Service” or click here to read the full issue of ‘Connection’ online at Issuu.com/YoungArchitectsForum.

Early Registration for SFI 14 & PIDI NYC End 2/28

SFI14_logo

Early Bird Registration for Structures for Inclusion 14 and Public Interest Design Institute Training NYC both end this Friday, February 28, 2014.

This year SFI 14 will take place from March 22-23, 2014, at Parsons the New School for Design in New York City on the theme “Broadcast. Forecast.” Along with panel discussions and presentations by 2014 SEED Award Winners, the weekend will include workshops and breakout sessions for attendees to address “What is the future of Public Interest Design?”

Click here to secure a place at SFI 14 by February 28, 2014, with the Early Bird Registration prices of $150 for General Admission and $50 for Students, online at DesignCorps.org/SFI14.

PIDINYC

PIDI Training in New York City will begin right after SFI 14, occurring March 24-25, 2014, at the  J. Max Bond Center on Design for the Just City at the City College of New York. The curriculum is formed around the SEED metric and will “provide design and planning professionals with in-depth study on methods of how design can address the critical issues faced by communities.” The two-day course will include presentations from Design Corp’s Bryan Bell, Enterprise Community Partners’ Shola Olatoye, UPSTATE Director and Syracuse University Professor Marc Norman, J. Max Bond Center’s Esther Yang and Toni L. Griffin (see her TED City2.0 talk here), and Shed Studio’s Rashmi Ramaswamy.

Click here to register for PIDI Training NYC by February 28, 2014, with the Early Bird Registration prices of $400 for Standard Registration, $250 for Professional Association members, and $200 for Students, online at PublicInterestDesign.com/NYC.

If you are considering attending both SFI 14 and PIDI NYC, there is a combination price available at $300 for Professionals and $150 for Students, online at DesignCorps.org/SFI14.

Early Registration for SFI 14 & PIDI NYC End 2/28

SFI14_logo

Early Bird Registration for Structures for Inclusion 14 and Public Interest Design Institute Training NYC both end this Friday, February 28, 2014.

This year SFI 14 will take place from March 22-23, 2014, at Parsons the New School for Design in New York City on the theme “Broadcast. Forecast.” Along with panel discussions and presentations by 2014 SEED Award Winners, the weekend will include workshops and breakout sessions for attendees to address “What is the future of Public Interest Design?”

Click here to secure a place at SFI 14 by February 28, 2014, with the Early Bird Registration prices of $150 for General Admission and $50 for Students, online at DesignCorps.org/SFI14.

PIDINYC

PIDI Training in New York City will begin right after SFI 14, occurring March 24-25, 2014, at the  J. Max Bond Center on Design for the Just City at the City College of New York. The curriculum is formed around the SEED metric and will “provide design and planning professionals with in-depth study on methods of how design can address the critical issues faced by communities.” The two-day course will include presentations from Design Corp’s Bryan Bell, Enterprise Community Partners’ Shola Olatoye, UPSTATE Director and Syracuse University Professor Marc Norman, J. Max Bond Center’s Esther Yang and Toni L. Griffin (see her TED City2.0 talk here), and Shed Studio’s Rashmi Ramaswamy.

Click here to register for PIDI Training NYC by February 28, 2014, with the Early Bird Registration prices of $400 for Standard Registration, $250 for Professional Association members, and $200 for Students, online at PublicInterestDesign.com/NYC.

If you are considering attending both SFI 14 and PIDI NYC, there is a combination price available at $300 for Professionals and $150 for Students, online at DesignCorps.org/SFI14.

Registration Open for Structures for Inclusion 14

SFI14_logo

Following up on yesterday’s post on the 2014 SEED Award Winners, the fourteenth annual Structures for Inclusion (SFI) conference, where winning teams will present their projects, is now open for registration. Co-hosted by Parsons The New School for Design, SFI14 will take place on March 22-23, 2014, at Parsons’ University Center in the heart of New York City. Along with the two-day conference, the Public Interest Design Institute will be conducting it’s 20th training program at the J. Max Bond Center on Design for the Just City at the City College of New York on March 24-25–the first one to be held in New York City since the program began in 2011.

From its inception in 2000, the goals of the SFI conference have been to showcase design efforts that serve a diverse clientele by presenting inspiring projects, pathways to pursue alternative community-based work, and evidence of the positive impact of this work. Funding for the awards and conference are provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Surdna Foundation.

Click here for more information or to register for SFI14. Registeration pricing ranges from $25-$200, with Super Early Bird ending February 7, 2014, and Early Bird ending February 28, 2014. Additional updates on the agenda and speakers will be posted here at PublicInterestDesign.org as they are available.

Public Interest Design Institute Featured on WNPR

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In the lead up to Public Interest Design Institute’s SEED Training at Yale School of Architecture last week, WNPR host John Dankosky spoke with Alan Plattus, professor at Yale and founder of Yale Urban Design Workshop, Bryan Bell, Executive Director of Design Corps, and Anne Frederick, Founding Director of Hester Street Collective. Kicking off the show with a quote from our own John Cary, Dankosky digs into the work of Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, Rural Studio, and many other organizations–including those of the guests–who are ‘Solving Social Problems Using Public Interest Design.’

“Social” or “public-interest” design is working in high-risk neighborhoods all over the country, proving that thoughtful, community-involved design ideas really can address a community’s critical issues and needs. Architect Bryan Bell says, “Never before have so many of the world’s problems been as accessible to design solutions.”

Click here to listen to the entire show, online at WNPR.org.

Architect Magazine Covers PID Institute

pidi

The AIA‘s Architect Magazine last week profiled an initiative it has sponsored, called the Public Interest Design Institute (PIDI), launched by Design Corps in 2011 to promote the Social/Economic/Environmental Design (SEED) Network. The piece, titled “How Public Interest Design Can Pull Its Own Weight,” is subtitled “Through two-day institutes, SEED Network co-founders have committed to training 800 people per year in public interest design.”

It doesn’t matter where the term “public interest design” came from—it only matters where it’s going. That’s what Design Corps founder Bryan Bell wants people to know about the Public Interest Design Institute, which is heading to Mexico. Bell, just back from a planning trip there for the first international institute location, says he’s ready to take the institute overseas. A long-time fledgling movement, public interest design is now coming into its own, and it’s building a critical mass both here and abroad.

Click here to read “How Public Interest Design Can Pull Its Own Weight,” online at ArchitectMagazine.com.