Project H Design

GOOD: "The Symbol of Public-Interest Design"

In his latest piece for GOOD, “How a Rwandan Hospital Became the Symbol of Public-Interest Design,” our own John Cary tells the story of MASS Design Group–newly-crowned winner of the 2012 Designer of the Year award from Contract Magazine–and its extraordinary Butaro Hospital.

More than the hospital or its designers, the piece covers several major developments in the broader field. Among others, groups cited include Architecture for Humanity, Design Corps, Project H Design, and Public Architecture; newer entities like bcWORKSHOP, IDEO.org, and SCALEAfrica; and even mainstream firms with pronounced pro bono agendas, like fuseproject, HOK, Pentagram, and Perkins+Will.

Click here to read “How a Rwandan Hospital Became the Symbol of Public-Interest Design” in GOOD.

GOOD: “The Symbol of Public-Interest Design”

In his latest piece for GOOD, “How a Rwandan Hospital Became the Symbol of Public-Interest Design,” our own John Cary tells the story of MASS Design Group–newly-crowned winner of the 2012 Designer of the Year award from Contract Magazine–and its extraordinary Butaro Hospital.

More than the hospital or its designers, the piece covers several major developments in the broader field. Among others, groups cited include Architecture for Humanity, Design Corps, Project H Design, and Public Architecture; newer entities like bcWORKSHOP, IDEO.org, and SCALEAfrica; and even mainstream firms with pronounced pro bono agendas, like fuseproject, HOK, Pentagram, and Perkins+Will.

Click here to read “How a Rwandan Hospital Became the Symbol of Public-Interest Design” in GOOD.

Yale to host next Public Interest Design Institute

The Yale School of Architecture in New Haven, Conn., will host the third Public Interest Design Institute (PIDI) training program, to take place Friday and Saturday, January 13-14, 2012. Made possible by support from the Surdna Foundation and the The Architectural League of New York, this session will include speakers such as Beyond Shelter author Marie Alquilino, 2011-2012 Loeb Fellow Anna Heringer, Emily Pilloton of Project H Design, Michael Murphy of MASS Design Group, Yale Urban Design Workshop founder Alan Plattus, David Perkes of the Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, as well as (organizer) Bryan Bell of Design Corps.

The early bird registration fee of $350 applies through Friday, December 16; thereafter the cost increases to $450. Future session hosts include University of Texas at Austin (March 22, 2012) and University of Cincinnati (April 13-14, 2012).

Click here for more information on the Yale session and PIDI generally.

Kickstarter campaign launched for "Studio H" film

PublicInterestDesign.org has profiled Studio H, the brainchild of Project H Design, here multiple times, but words and images alone cannot do their work justice. Thankfully, acclaimed filmmakers Christine O’Malley and Patrick Creadon of O’Malley Creadon Productions–along with award-winning producer Neal Baer–are bringing the good work of Studio H to life on the big screen.

The filmmakers have just launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund continued development of the film. Among their many films, two–Wordplay and I.O.U.S.A.–premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and went on to successful theatrical releases. We look forward to following and promoting this important campaign and film in the coming weeks and months.

Click here to visit the Kickstarter campaign page for Studio H and back this great project.

Kickstarter campaign launched for “Studio H” film

PublicInterestDesign.org has profiled Studio H, the brainchild of Project H Design, here multiple times, but words and images alone cannot do their work justice. Thankfully, acclaimed filmmakers Christine O’Malley and Patrick Creadon of O’Malley Creadon Productions–along with award-winning producer Neal Baer–are bringing the good work of Studio H to life on the big screen.

The filmmakers have just launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund continued development of the film. Among their many films, two–Wordplay and I.O.U.S.A.–premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and went on to successful theatrical releases. We look forward to following and promoting this important campaign and film in the coming weeks and months.

Click here to visit the Kickstarter campaign page for Studio H and back this great project.

NEA Announces $475,000 in Design Grants

We round out another Friday with news from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the announcement of $475,000 in new design grants. The 20 grantees were among those that applied to the NEA’s March 2011 cycle, and were then approved by the National Arts Council in recent weeks.

Among other grantees were public interest design leaders such as Architecture for Humanity, Center for Urban Pedagogy, Project H Design, and the Affordable Housing Design Leadership Institute of Enterprise Community Partners. Project supported range from convenings and exhibitions, to online initiatives and competitions.

Click here to learn more about all 20 NEA design grantees. The next deadline for NEA design grant applications is March 10, 2012.

Upcoming Studio H exhibition in Portland, OR

The good work of Project H, specifically its high school design/build program, Studio H, will be the subject of a special exhibition opening later this month at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Ore.

This exhibition asks viewers to reflect on how that process can teach the next generation of designers to transform the world for themselves. Artifacts from Studio H, the project in rural Bertie County, North Carolina where Emily Pilloton and partner Matthew Miller teach design thinking to high-school students, will be on display to illustrate how a socially engaged design process can result in significant and positive solutions. Together, Pilloton and Miller engage in a bold experiment of design-led community transformation.

Click here for more information about the exhibition, Project H, Studio H, and some of our recent coverage of their efforts here and here and here and here.

Studio H profiled in the New York Times

“It changed the way I see the world, and made me expect more of myself.” So reads a powerful quote in today’s New York Times about Studio H, the high school design/build program launched by Emily Pilloton and Matt Miller of Project H in rural North Carolina. It doesn’t get much better than that for any experience, but imagine feeling and articulating such a thing as one high schooler did at the opening of Studio H’s market earlier this month. The project–a 2,000 sf farmers market–overcame countless odds to see the light of day. As reported in the New York Times today:

Studio H always threatened to be a risky endeavor for Ms. Pilloton, 29, and Mr. Miller, 33, who moved from San Francisco to Windsor to run the course. They had chosen to work in a depressed rural area, scarred by racial tension with severely limited employment opportunities in the belief that a project like Studio H would be of greatest value there. Windsor is in Bertie County, one of the poorest parts of North Carolina. It is also vulnerable to extreme weather. Since moving there, Ms. Pilloton and Mr. Miller have helped with the local relief effort after two hurricanes and a tornado.

Click here to read the complete article or click here to learn more about Studio H.

New Studio H market profiled by Fast Company

Studio H–the brainchild of partners Emily Pilloton and Matt Miller of Project H Design–won some hard-earned coverage from Fast Company yesterday, with its article titled “High School Students Build A Farmer’s Market in a Food Desert.” That’s right: high school students. Over the course of the academic year, a group of students (profiled here previously) from Bertie County, N.C., designed and built a beautiful structure, now functioning as a farmers’ market. Participating students received college credits and pay for their work on the 2,000 square foot structure.

According to the article, “Before even thinking about building, Pilloton had to start with the basics. ‘Almost none of the students knew how to read a ruler,’ she says. ‘None had any design experience, and some had never even held a hammer.’ So Miller and Pilloton taught the students math, how to lay out projects, how to use shop equipment–essentially, everything they needed to know to go out and build.”

Click here to read the full Fast Company article.

GOOD: Architecture’s Identity Problems

Public interest design expands well beyond the confines of the architecture profession. In fact, some of the foremost leaders of the public interest design movement have pointed to the limits of that profession as their motivation to blaze new trails. Some of those same leaders–Bryan Bell of Design Corps, Cameron Sinclair of Architecture for Humanity, Liz Ogbu of IDEO.org, Sergio Palleroni of the BaSiC Initiative, Emily Pilloton of Project H Design, Katie Swenson of the Enterprise Rose Fellowship, and yours truly, to name just a few–are among those unlicensed architects. Other more public design figures, such as Maya Lin and HUD Sec. Shaun Donovan, are also relegated to the status of “intern” in the profession’s definition. PublicInterestDesign.org‘s John Cary offers his take on the situation in his first op-ed for GOOD, published yesterday, asking:

Rather than spending their energy protecting their territory and titles, what if architects and their associations focused on resolving our nation’s housing crisis, improving our schools, or generally creating more inspiring environments for people to live their best lives?

Click here to read the complete article.