SEED Network

4 Ways to Present at SFI 14 (+ Attend for Free)

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Structures for Inclusion 14 has announced four opportunities to present and lead workshops at this year’s annual convening March 22-23 in New York City–and if selected, receive free registration for you and five friends, colleagues, or relatives. Long-time SFI attendees Elizabeth Jones of bcWORKSHOP and Krista Wilson of Detroit Collaborative Design Center collaborated with Design Corps and SEED Network to open the floor to attendees in the following areas:

1. Propose a session for “What is the Future of Public Interest Design?” What is your vision for this emerging field? We are all a part of shaping this. Get your ideas out there by applying here.

2. Propose a session for practical tools to use after the conference: “What To Do On Monday.” What do you know that others need to know? These can be either at an entry or advanced level. Apply here.

3. LUNCHA KUCHA! Present your work or project during the pecha kucha lunch hour at SFI by applying here.

4. Lead a hands-on workshop for local youth about how design could benefit their neighborhood, city or the world — in collaboration with the Cooper Hewitt and held at the Cooper Hewitt Harlem Center. (March 21, 4:00pm to 6:00 pm). Apply here.

Click the links above to apply to the four open invitations by February 15, 2014. Click here for full details on SFI 14, online at DesignCorps.org.

2014 SEED Award Winners Annouced

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The fourth annual SEED Award Winners for 2014 were announced yesterday. Nine projects were selected from applications representing 28 countries to epitomize the best in design that is addressing critical social, economic, and environmental issues. You might notice a few previous award winners from the PID Global Awards, which were announced in December last year. Three projects have been honored with both a SEED 2014 Award and a PID Global Award, along with three projects that received a combination of a Honorable Mention and Winner award from each jury. Winning teams will present their projects at Structures for Inclusion 14, taking place March 22-23, 2014, at Parsons The New School for Design in New York City. The lucky dual award winners will make their way to Paris in April for PID Global convening.

Winning Projects

The Potty Project – New Delhi, India

Manica Football for Hope Centre – Bairro Vumba, Manica, Mozambique

Community How-To-Guides – Detroit, Michigan, USA

Comunidad Ecologica Saludable – Lima, Peru

Can City – Sao Paulo, Brazil

TAEQ Green Building Headquarters – Sakhnin, Israel

Honorable Mentions

Re: Dimen Kam Minority Cultural Heritage – Dimen, China

Walk [Your City] – Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

People Organizing Place [POP] - Neighborhood Stories,  Dallas, TX

Click here to read more about the nine 2014 SEED Award Winners, online at DesignCorps.org/Awards.

PID Global Announces Six Project Winners

PID Global Winners 2014

Public Interest Design Global–a collaboration between Ecole Spécial d’Architecture, Design Corps and the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network–has announced six winning projects that will be presented at the two-day global convening in Paris on April 18 and 19, 2014, along with six honorable mentions.

Project applicants–which represented 28 countries–were measured on “effectiveness, excellence, inclusiveness, impactful, systemic and participatory” by an international jury, including Cindy Cooper of Impact Entrepreneurs, Maggie Stephenson of UNHabitat, Raul Pantaleo of Studio TAMassociati, Deanna VanBuren of FOURM Design Studio, and Vinay Venkatarman of Frugal Digital. From buildings to graphic design to furniture making, the projects have made an impact beyond the tangible product, including creating jobs, increasing public safety, and encouraging healthy actions.  More

SEED Issues Press Release on July 27 Meeting

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Harvard Graduate School of Design’s Loeb Fellowship Unites Social Economic Environmental Design Leaders.” So reads the headline of an August 22 press release on the July 27 meeting on realizing the great potential of the SEED Network. According to the release, “Network leaders take important steps toward shared governance, partnerships, and global outreach.” Commendably, “The most significant outcome of the meeting was a call for shared governance of the SEED Network…To that end, a 15-person advisory board…was tasked with steering what is currently a program of nonprofit Design Corps into an independent organization.”

The advisory board will look to increase SEED’s influence beyond the existing community design sector, and extend membership to include citizens, policy makers, corporations, and other stakeholders. As discussed during the meeting, one viable means to achieve this new goal is a possible partnership with the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). In addition to tapping into the organization’s vast network, SEED has much to offer as the USGBC seeks to add social performance metrics to its widely-adopted Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) credential.

Click here to download a PDF of the recent SEED leadership meeting press release.

"Calling for a Triple Bottom Line Design Metric"

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Our own John Cary took to the pages of Stanford Social Innovation Review yesterday to lay out (here) a rationale for the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network to partner with what it has long considered its arch rival, the U.S. Green Building Council and its popular Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) program. “Whereas LEED is institutionalized throughout the building sector, SEED is a slow-growing, grassroots initiative.” Such a partnership could finally engage a critical mass of mainstream building industry practitioners, actual users, and the public at large.

Rather than remain a shoestring operation, SEED should leverage the USGBC’s vast network and resources. Both SEED and LEED would become stronger programs for it. Such a partnership–between the Congress for New Urbanism, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the USGBC–led to the development of the LEED for Neighborhood Development (or LEED-ND) standard, launched in 2009. It provides an environmental strategy for entire communities, while also addressing many of the economic and social elements espoused by SEED, albeit only at one particular scale.

Click here to read “Calling for a Triple Bottom Line Design Metric,” online at SSIReview.org.

“Calling for a Triple Bottom Line Design Metric”

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Our own John Cary took to the pages of Stanford Social Innovation Review yesterday to lay out (here) a rationale for the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network to partner with what it has long considered its arch rival, the U.S. Green Building Council and its popular Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) program. “Whereas LEED is institutionalized throughout the building sector, SEED is a slow-growing, grassroots initiative.” Such a partnership could finally engage a critical mass of mainstream building industry practitioners, actual users, and the public at large.

Rather than remain a shoestring operation, SEED should leverage the USGBC’s vast network and resources. Both SEED and LEED would become stronger programs for it. Such a partnership–between the Congress for New Urbanism, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the USGBC–led to the development of the LEED for Neighborhood Development (or LEED-ND) standard, launched in 2009. It provides an environmental strategy for entire communities, while also addressing many of the economic and social elements espoused by SEED, albeit only at one particular scale.

Click here to read “Calling for a Triple Bottom Line Design Metric,” online at SSIReview.org.

Architect Magazine Covers PID Institute

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The AIA‘s Architect Magazine last week profiled an initiative it has sponsored, called the Public Interest Design Institute (PIDI), launched by Design Corps in 2011 to promote the Social/Economic/Environmental Design (SEED) Network. The piece, titled “How Public Interest Design Can Pull Its Own Weight,” is subtitled “Through two-day institutes, SEED Network co-founders have committed to training 800 people per year in public interest design.”

It doesn’t matter where the term “public interest design” came from—it only matters where it’s going. That’s what Design Corps founder Bryan Bell wants people to know about the Public Interest Design Institute, which is heading to Mexico. Bell, just back from a planning trip there for the first international institute location, says he’s ready to take the institute overseas. A long-time fledgling movement, public interest design is now coming into its own, and it’s building a critical mass both here and abroad.

Click here to read “How Public Interest Design Can Pull Its Own Weight,” online at ArchitectMagazine.com.

SEED Evaluator 3.0 to Launch During PID Week

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Design Corps–one of our Public Interest Design Week partners–this morning announced that Version 3.0 of the Social/Economic/Environmental Design (SEED) Evaluator, an evolving web-based tool, will officially launch next Saturday, March 23, during the Structures for Inclusion conference. “SFI” participants will receive the first peek at this new, collaborative design tool. Thereafter, it will be available free of charge, online at SEEDNetwork.org.

Based on SEED’s bottom-up approach to design problem-solving that truly activates community concerns, the SEED Evaluator 3.0 not only advocates, but also requires an inclusive and participatory process for achieving successful design projects with involvement from community stakeholders as well as designers and project planners. The tool offers specific steps for creating a collaborative approach to public interest design and for identifying and measuring the success of like-minded project goals focused on the triple-bottom line of social justice, economic development, and environmental conservation.

Click here to register to attend Structures for Inclusion and other Public Interest Design Week events, online at EventBrite.com, or click here to learn more about the SEED Network and Evaluator tool, online at SEEDNetwork.org.

Structures for Inclusion Workshops Announced

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Rounding out the Structures for Inclusion conference and Public Interest Design Week generally will be half a dozen workshops, offering deep dives into a range of topics. An SFI tradition, the workshops will take place the morning of Sunday, March 24, from 9-10:30am and 11am-12:30pm. The workshops are included as a part of the regular SFI registration. They will take place in Rapson Hall, running parallel with the Iconathon being led by The Noun Project.

9-10:30am
Workshop 1A: Human-Centered Design 101
Led by Liz Ogbu of CCA & Marika Shioiri-Clark of Soshl Studio

Workshop 1B: Applying for the Enterprise Rose Fellowship
Led by Katie Swenson of Enterprise Community Partners

11am-12:30pm
Workshop 2A: Affordable Housing Finance
Led by Casius Pealer of Oyster Tree Consulting

Workshop 2B: Introduction to the SEED Evaluator 3.0
Led by Lisa Abendroth of Metropolitan State University of Denver & Bryan Bell of Design Corps

Click here for more information or to register for Structures for Inclusion and other Public Interest Design Week events, online at PublicInterestDesign.org. Caption: Toolbox icon designed by Daniel Hickey; sourced via The Noun Project.

"Intelligent Coalitions" Presentations Video Online

Once again, nearly a year to the day of the 2012 Social Impact Design Summit, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum held an evening event to mark the launch of a white paper on the summit. The full 90-minute video is now available, above.

Moderated by Cynthia Smith, Curator of Socially Responsible Design at the Cooper-Hewitt, the five presenters (in order of appearance) included: Ezio Manzini of the Design for Social Innovation and Sustainability (DESIS) Network, Mariana Amatullo of Designmatters at Art Center College of Design, Bryan Bell of the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Network, Nadia Elkordy, representing the International Design Innovation Network (IDIN), and Krista Donaldson of D-Rev.

Click here for more information on the “Intelligent Coalitions: Design and Social Impact event,” online at CooperHewitt.org.