TED Prize

8 Talks on the Future of Cities from New TED City2.0 Site

TEDCity2org

In 2012, The City2.0 was the first idea to be awarded a TED Prize. The City2.0’s aim was to become “an ever-expanding network of citizen-led, scalable experiments” where individuals and communities around the world would engage  through “editorial content, a shareable project database, tools for local engagement, and resources for executing ideas.” Nearly two years later, TEDCity2.org relaunched to meet it’s mission more succinctly. Designed by Kiss Me I’m Polish, the revamped site contains new talks on housing, education, and food; videos on 10 local projects that received funding; and resources for those hoping to spark change in their own cities. To help get you started, the TED Blog has identified 8 fantastic talks on the future of cities that missed the TED.com circuit.

In 2012, for the first time in history the TED Prize went not to a person, but to an idea on which our future depends: The City 2.0. We’ve examined the intersection of ingenuity and urbanity in TED talks, gatherings around the globe, micro-philanthropy and even collaborative action.

Click here to watch all 8 Future of Cities Talks on TED.com, or click here to explore the new TED City2.0 site on TEDCity2.org.

What’s Your $1 Million Wish for the World?

tedprize2010

Nominations for the 2015 TED Prize–an award worth $1 million–are open now through March 31, 2014. TED is seeking a visionary “who has not only a great wish, but a track record that suggests they could accomplish it.” While nominations are coming in, TED offered up the question “How would you make a difference with $1 million?” to TED.com fans around the world. Recurring themes around employment, health, parenting, and children came in from respondents, reinforcing the common challenges humanity continues to face. One response in particular from Nicholas Yong Cam-U made us ponder creativity, purpose, and in particular, how this could influence the work around public interest design.

I would invest in designing a watch that measures the quality of time uniquely to each and every user. Why? Because time is the container that holds and dictates all of our efforts, and I believe we have an outdated approach and perception towards it. Earth didn’t come prepackaged with the 9-5 system, so why are we spending our time like it did? If we can accept the simple fact that we function differently at different hours, we can begin organizing in a way that makes sense and is not merely to satisfy the system. If we can design a time system that brings out the best in people, we are laying the foundation for more amazing skills and great minds to grow on.

Click here to read more responses to “What’s Your $1 Million Wish for the World?”, online at Blog.TED.com.

What's Your $1 Million Wish for the World?

tedprize2010

Nominations for the 2015 TED Prize–an award worth $1 million–are open now through March 31, 2014. TED is seeking a visionary “who has not only a great wish, but a track record that suggests they could accomplish it.” While nominations are coming in, TED offered up the question “How would you make a difference with $1 million?” to TED.com fans around the world. Recurring themes around employment, health, parenting, and children came in from respondents, reinforcing the common challenges humanity continues to face. One response in particular from Nicholas Yong Cam-U made us ponder creativity, purpose, and in particular, how this could influence the work around public interest design.

I would invest in designing a watch that measures the quality of time uniquely to each and every user. Why? Because time is the container that holds and dictates all of our efforts, and I believe we have an outdated approach and perception towards it. Earth didn’t come prepackaged with the 9-5 system, so why are we spending our time like it did? If we can accept the simple fact that we function differently at different hours, we can begin organizing in a way that makes sense and is not merely to satisfy the system. If we can design a time system that brings out the best in people, we are laying the foundation for more amazing skills and great minds to grow on.

Click here to read more responses to “What’s Your $1 Million Wish for the World?”, online at Blog.TED.com.

NEA Impact Design Webinar at 2pm ET Today

NEAWebinar2

The first in a series of three webinars from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is taking place today, Wednesday, April 24, at 2pm EST. The title and focus of the webinar is “Creating a Culture of Storytelling & Evaluation.”

Hosted by our own John Cary, the webinar will feature storytelling and evaluation experts Courtney E. Martin, co-founder of the Solution Journalism Network, and Jamia Wilson, Chief Storyteller of the new $1,000,000 TED Prize.

Click here to register for “Creating a Culture of Storytelling & Evaluation.” All webinars are archived and available for viewing shortly after the live presentation.

2014 TED Prize Call for Nominations

2014tedprizecall

Nominations for the 2014 TED Prize are officially open between now and June 1, 2013. The $1,000,000 prize is “awarded to an extraordinary individual with a creative and bold vision to spark global change. By leveraging the TED community’s resources and investing $1,000,000 into a powerful idea, the TED Prize supports one wish to inspire the world.”

Nominate an individual–or yourself–to envision and execute a high-impact project that can spur global change. Our TED Prize winner will have an ambitious wish–and the vision, pragmatism and leadership to turn it into reality.

Click here to learn more about or nominate someone for the 2014 TED Prize, online at TED.com. Caption: Graphic timeline (and larger infographic, here) designed by our partner, Megan Jett.

Reminder: $10,000 City 2.0 Award Apps Due 8/15

This Wednesday, August 15, marks the next deadline to apply for the $10,000 City 2.0 Award. The awards are part of this year’s TED Prize, focused on the future of cities. TED is granting ten $10,000 awards for local projects likely to spur the creation of the City 2.0.

Projects should be based on creative ideas that can be replicated and spread to other cities. A group of people, rather than just an individual, will ideally be committed to the project. We encourage cross-disciplinary teams and will favor organizing groups that actively engage local community members in their work. Unproven concepts with a strong action plan are welcome. Our goal is to help people experiment and think big.

Click here for more information on the City 2.0 Awards, online at TheCity2.org.

2012 TED Prize, “The City 2.0,” Relaunched

TED–the nonprofit focused on “ideas worth spreading”–today announced the relaunch of The City 2.0, the subject of this year’s TED Prize, along with its corresponding website, TheCity2.org. Intended to be a platform for citizen-powered change, the theme of the new website is “Stories that inspire. Projects that transform.” PublicInterestDesign.org‘s own John Cary and his partner, Courtney E. Martin, have led the effort to reposition the City 2.0, working side by side with TED’s Lara Stein. The team partnered with Seso, a Los Angeles-based creative agency, who designed and developed TheCity2.org website.

The City 2.0 website is a platform created to surface the myriad stories and collective actions being taken by citizens around the world. We draw on the best of what is already being discovered by urban advocates and add grassroots movers and shakers into the mix. What’s emerging is a complex picture of the future city–a place more playful, more safe, more beautiful, and more healthy for everyone.

Click here to visit TheCity2.org and learn more about this year’s TED Prize.

2012 TED Prize, "The City 2.0," Relaunched

TED–the nonprofit focused on “ideas worth spreading”–today announced the relaunch of The City 2.0, the subject of this year’s TED Prize, along with its corresponding website, TheCity2.org. Intended to be a platform for citizen-powered change, the theme of the new website is “Stories that inspire. Projects that transform.” PublicInterestDesign.org‘s own John Cary and his partner, Courtney E. Martin, have led the effort to reposition the City 2.0, working side by side with TED’s Lara Stein. The team partnered with Seso, a Los Angeles-based creative agency, who designed and developed TheCity2.org website.

The City 2.0 website is a platform created to surface the myriad stories and collective actions being taken by citizens around the world. We draw on the best of what is already being discovered by urban advocates and add grassroots movers and shakers into the mix. What’s emerging is a complex picture of the future city–a place more playful, more safe, more beautiful, and more healthy for everyone.

Click here to visit TheCity2.org and learn more about this year’s TED Prize.

$100,000 to be awarded via TED’s City 2.0

TED has issued a call for proposals in conjunction with its 2012 TED Prize, the City 2.0. Between now and May 15, groups can apply for mini-grants of $10,000, of which ten will be awarded, to support local projects in line with the values of the City 2.0–inclusive, innovative, healthy, thriving, soulful. Selected projects will be announced in late-June at the annual TEDGlobal conference. Among other notes, TED emphasizes that “Unproven concepts with a strong action plan are welcome.”

This one-time grants program from TED constitutes a fraction of the funding being mobilized through ArtPlace, profiled here previously, and the National Endowment for the ArtsOur Town program, profiled here previously. But what it lacks in deep pockets, the global reach of TED may be even more significant.

Click here to apply for the City 2.0 grants.

$100,000 to be awarded via TED's City 2.0

TED has issued a call for proposals in conjunction with its 2012 TED Prize, the City 2.0. Between now and May 15, groups can apply for mini-grants of $10,000, of which ten will be awarded, to support local projects in line with the values of the City 2.0–inclusive, innovative, healthy, thriving, soulful. Selected projects will be announced in late-June at the annual TEDGlobal conference. Among other notes, TED emphasizes that “Unproven concepts with a strong action plan are welcome.”

This one-time grants program from TED constitutes a fraction of the funding being mobilized through ArtPlace, profiled here previously, and the National Endowment for the ArtsOur Town program, profiled here previously. But what it lacks in deep pockets, the global reach of TED may be even more significant.

Click here to apply for the City 2.0 grants.