Tulane City Center

PIDI Winds Down, As SFI12 Ramps Up

Today rounds out Day 2 of Bryan Bell‘s Public Interest Design Institute training program at the University of Texas at Austin, with Michael Murphy of MASS Design Group, Maurice Cox of the University of Virginia, Katie Swenson of Enterprise Community Partners, and former Rose Fellow Jamie Blosser of the Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative taking the podium. The two-day affair will culminate with what Bell calls the “SEED Certification Test,” when the 50+ participants will be examined on their familiarity with the principles and practice of the Social Economic Environmental Design Network.

This evening, Bell will kick off the 12th annual Structures for Inclusion conference, also being hosted by and at UT-Austin. Many of the speakers that partook in the above training program populate the conference roster, with several additions, including the likes of Emilie Taylor of the Tulane City Center, Coleman Coker of buildingstudio, and Gail Vittori of the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems. But first, Bell will screen a cut of the first “SEEDoc,” profiled here previously. That video will hopefully be available online shortly, and we’re told that a live-stream of Structures for Inclusion may be as well. So stay tuned.

Click here to learn more about Structures for Inclusion 12 on the Design Corps website.

ArchRecord: Univ. Humanitarian Design Programs

There are estimated to be over 100 community design programs in universities across the country, a great many of which maintain active design/build components or full-blown community design centers. The fourth of seven sections of “The Good List,” published by Architectural Record, profiles a few standout programs. Each is recognized nationally and distinguished for their commitment to good design and unique models of community engagement.

University-based programs profiled include the Portland State University / University of Texas at Austin Building Sustainable Communities (BaSiC) Initiative, The Building Project at Yale University, The Carl Small Town Center at Mississippi State University, the Detroit Collaborative Design Center at the University of Detroit-Mercy, the Gulf Coast Community Design Studio (GCCDS) also at Mississippi State University, The Rural Studio at Auburn University, Studio 804 at the University of Kansas, the Tulane City Center at Tulane University, and the University of Arkansas Community Design Center.

Click here to read “The Good List” in its entirety. Caption: Photo of the Lion’s Park Playscape, a Rural Studio thesis project, in Greensboro, Ala., featured here in this month’s Architectural Record.

Hollygrove Market & Farm

Following-up on our last post about the upcoming Public Interest Design Institute training program at the Tulane School of Architecture in early-November, the Hollygrove Market & Farm warrants further coverage.

“After Hurricane Katrina, we formed the Carrollton-Hollygrove Community Development Corporation to help residents return to their homes in this neighborhood,” explained Executive Director Paul Baricos in his interview for The Power of Pro Bono book. “We turned our focus to community revitalization as well as housing issues. We saw food justice and food security as an issue in Hollygrove, especially after the storm. There are several corner stores here, but they mostly sell alcohol, cigarettes, and junk food–nothing fresh.” So Baricos partnered with the Tulane School of Architecture and its Tulane City Center on what would become the Hollygrove Market & Farm.

“The pavilion, built by the Tulane students under Cordula Roser Gray of crgarchitecture,” Baricos goes on, “is a shaded space for teaching. The structure serves as an example of environmentally conscious building and has become the centerpiece of the site. People immediately see the pavilion when they first come in. Its materials are brightly colored, and the roof is dramatic. A gutter runs prominently through the roof to collect rainwater and empties into a 1,000-gallon cistern enclosed in translucent Plexiglas. We’re so proud of it; when we give tours or when we talk to anybody about the farm, the pavilion is the first thing we mention.”

Credit: Photo by Will Crocker.

Hollygrove Market & Farm

Following-up on our last post about the upcoming Public Interest Design Institute training program at the Tulane School of Architecture in early-November, the Hollygrove Market & Farm warrants further coverage.

“After Hurricane Katrina, we formed the Carrollton-Hollygrove Community Development Corporation to help residents return to their homes in this neighborhood,” explained Executive Director Paul Baricos in his interview for The Power of Pro Bono book. “We turned our focus to community revitalization as well as housing issues. We saw food justice and food security as an issue in Hollygrove, especially after the storm. There are several corner stores here, but they mostly sell alcohol, cigarettes, and junk food–nothing fresh.” So Baricos partnered with the Tulane School of Architecture and its Tulane City Center on what would become the Hollygrove Market & Farm.

“The pavilion, built by the Tulane students under Cordula Roser Gray of crgarchitecture,” Baricos goes on, “is a shaded space for teaching. The structure serves as an example of environmentally conscious building and has become the centerpiece of the site. People immediately see the pavilion when they first come in. Its materials are brightly colored, and the roof is dramatic. A gutter runs prominently through the roof to collect rainwater and empties into a 1,000-gallon cistern enclosed in translucent Plexiglas. We’re so proud of it; when we give tours or when we talk to anybody about the farm, the pavilion is the first thing we mention.”

Credit: Photo by Will Crocker.

Tulane to host Public Interest Design Institute

The Public Interest Design Institute training program will visit New Orleans for its next convening, November 4-5, 2011. This third official institute will be hosted by the Tulane University School of Architecture, offering in-depth study over two days on methods of how design can address critical issues faced by communities. The PIDI curriculum itself is structured around the Social/Economic/Environmental Design (SEED) metric.

The early-bird registration fee is $350 (a $100 discount), only through October 4, and then $450 thereafter. AIA members are also being offered a 2 for 1 special through October 14 (“AIA241″ promotional code). Click here for more information and to register.

Long a leader in public interest design work, but especially in the years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the Tulane School of Architecture has numerous programs focused on design and service. Chief among them is the Tulane City Center, one of many outcomes of which is the Hollygrove Market & Farm, a community design/build project realized by faculty member Cordula Roser Gray of crgarchitecture along with a team of Tulane students. Credit: Photo by Will Crocker.